Blog

  • Students Managing Their Own Loans?

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    Everywhere I go now I hear tales of anguish, anger and fear from college students who are facing years of debt payments after they graduate. Like so many systems in our culture, invented with at least the partial aim of enhancing freedom and democracy, the student loan system has become a means of debt slavery and social engineering. Think of the early days of television and the hopes for its ability to educate, communicate and entertain.
  • When Security is Justice: Because the Bible Told Me So

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    We humans constantly are telling ourselves stories about moral and immoral behavior. Many of the most memorable -- if only because of repetition -- are from the Bible. From them we learn about moral courage and cowardice, about wisdom and folly, about when to obey and when to rebel. And, of course, most Bible stories tell us to believe in God. But God -- He/She/It -- is so many things at once: God is Love, God is Nature, God is Truth. How can I believe in all these things at the same time?
  • Thoughts on John Kiriakou whose Portrait will be Unveiled January 23, 2013, in Washington, D.C.

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    On January 25th, 2013 in Washington, D.C., former CIA agent John Kiriakou (see his portrait here) will be sentenced to 2 ½ years in prison for revealing the name of an undercover CIA agent. On the eve of that sentencing, Americans Who Tell the Truth and the Government Accountability Project are unveiling his portrait (see details here) as the newest in the AWTT portrait series.
  • Kathleen Dean Moore from The Sun Magazine

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    One of the best interviews about Climate Change and how we should be responding to it is in the December 2012 issue of The Sun Magazine.
  • You Can Vote, But Can You Vote for Democracy?

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    Teachers may want to reproduce this conversation in their classrooms. Read Robert Shetterly┬┤s full post on the conversation he had about what constitutes democracy at commondreams.org.
  • Across the Partisan Divide: A Curious Encounter with My Senator, Susan Collins

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    On the first leg of a trip last week to work at the Maxwell School for Citizenship at the University of Syracuse, I flew from Bangor, Maine, to Washington, D.C. Sitting across from me in aisle two was one of Maine's senators, Susan Collins, a woman of enormous power, seniority and prestige in the Republican Party and our government. How often, I thought, does one get the serendipitous opportunity to talk with a senator? But another passenger sat between us, and I could not engage her.
  • In Memory of Larry Gibson: 1946 - 2012

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    We present our creation myths to ourselves as though they describe a one time event. But what we are really saying, when we say God, or Raven, or Spider, or Whatevercreated the Universe, rested, and looked upon the creation well satisfied, was that he, she or it was pleased with re-creation.
  • Report from Louisville: August 28-30, 2012

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    For many years Americans Who Tell the Truth has had a special relationship with the city, the people and the schools of Louisville, Kentucky. The last week of August this year marked one of the highpoints.On August 30th, The Muhammad Ali Center opened an exhibit of AWTT portraits titled Muhammad Ali and the Civil Rights Movement. 42 portraits that portray our country's long struggle for civil rights are hung beautifully in this remarkable space.
  • Labor Day, 2012: Thank Goodness Labor is its Own Reward!

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    A couple of nights ago I had dinner with friends I have known for a long time. I think allof them -- an inner city teacher, an artist, a retired doctor --- would describe themselves as liberals.
  • Elizabeth Mumbet Freeman and the End of Slavery in Massachusetts

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    It's true that the Americans Who Tell the Truth project has become all about education, but the primary education has been my own. In the past ten years I have learned more about our history, why our history is the way it is, and some of the people who have guided its evolution in order to be more in line with its own ideals than I had ever thought possible. Many of the people I've painted were totally unknown to me before I began the portrait series.